Found MUJI Paper

Paper goes hand in hand with life in Japan, as it is used widely in settings such as painting, drawing, writing, wrapping. It can also be seen in traditional Japanese homes, on sliding fusuma doors that partition spaces and the shoji screens that let natural light filter through. In addition, an array of different types of paper are continually being developed to meet the changing demands. Certain factors including the available resources or specific needs of a locale has had influence on the various productions. Paper types today range from the regional handcrafted to the industrial-use varieties, while there are also types which have been developed using advanced technology.

Found MUJI Paper visits areas in Japan where such paper types are produced. With their unique characteristics, each paper type has been considered and shaped into useful items which can be used in daily life.


Watermarked Paper
Echizen City, Fukui Prefecture

Echizen has a history of paper-making that spans over 1500 years. It was here that the watermarking technique used in banknotes and gift certificates was developed. Watermarked paper, which have designs that show through when held up to the light, is made by layering plain paper with paper containing the pattern. Lined paper produced with the watermarking technique feels different to paper with printed lines.


Mizumomigami
Echizen City, Fukui Prefecture

Mizumomigami is a type of paper used for fusuma doors that features patterns with special characteristics. Glue is applied to the paper before being crumpled and kneaded in dye. This brings out the wrinkled patterns that is deeply imbued in colour. Forming such patterns in a uniform manner without tearing the paper is a challenging task, and only a handful of artisans are able to craft the paper this way. The strength of this paper makes it suitable not for interior design alone, but for paper crafts as well.


Rakusuishi / Mizukirigami
Echizen City, Fukui Prefecture

Sprays of water are applied to the thinly spread out pulp to yield the delicate, lacey patterns of rakusuishi. The organic patterns formed by the sprays of water will not result in the same patterns each time. This technique is also used for crafting fine sheets of paper for wrapping traditional Japanese confectionery, however it can also be utilised in interior spaces as well gift wrapping.


Momigami
Ayabe City, Kyoto Prefecture

By uniformly rubbing a paste made of konnyaku into a kind of paper made of mulberry bark called kozo, it makes the tough paper easier to work with. There was even a time when momigami, which can be sewn like cloth, was used to make garments. The process to make this kind of paper involves repetitive hand-kneading for around 10 minutes, which results in a look that can only be obtained from natural materials and hand-crafting.


Paper Cloth
Mino City, Gifu Prefecture

Cloths woven with paper thread feels cool and light. Akin to hemp, this sensation is possible because thread made from paper is resistant to fluffing and pilling. Furthermore, the thread weighs just one-third that of cotton thread. Cotton is used for the warp threads and paper for the weft - this combination results in a cloth that is suitable for the summer season.


Paper String
Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture

Paper string is made by the intertwining of paper tape. The twisting process uses a wooden apparatus, which requires pressure adjustments since paper is a delicate material. Narrow paper tape is twisted to make fine string, and thicker types are made from broader widths. This kind of paper string is suitable for a wide range of uses, from bag handles to packaging ropes.


Paper Bands
Fuji City, Shizuoka Prefecture

Paper bands are a type of packaging material developed in Japan in the 1950s. Shortly after the war, a time when wooden crates and ties for transporting goods around Japan were scarce, people turned to paper as a solution and eventually paper bands were developed. It is still in use today, for example as part of the packaging for rice and grain. Around ten strands of paper string are arranged and glued together flat, making a band that can withstand dozens of kilograms. Paper bands are popular as materials for crafting as well, while baskets made of this material feature both sturdiness and the supple quality of paper.


Embossed Paper
Tamba City, Hyogo Prefecture

Pressing a metal die against paper yields an evenly contoured texture. An uneven surface creates a layer of air, giving it a cushioning function. For this reason, it has been used industrially as packaging for moving, to wrap large items such as mannequins and also factory materials.


Paper with Diamond-Patterned Threading
Tamba City, Hyogo Prefecture

This type of paper is made by resin threads arranged in a diamond pattern interlaced between two sheets of paper, which is then bound together. The points where the threads intersect become resistant to tearing, making this type of paper strong enough for items such as sacks used when moving and for wrapping textiles. At the Tamba production site, a range of different paper production processes are carried out including waxing and embossing.


Crepe Paper
Sennan City, Osaka Prefecture

A form of paper with tiny creases intended for industrial uses, such as for wrapping electric cables as well as iron or steel items. “Crepe” signifies the wrinkled texture or creasing in the paper and such creasing gives the paper elasticity, which is especially useful for wrapping round items. In addition, polyethylene processing on the reverse side adds water and damp-proof qualities to the paper, protecting the wrapped items from rust. Taking advantage of these characteristics, gusseted bags made from crepe paper could be useful in many ways.


All item information and selling prices are subject to in-store display.

Available while stock lasts.

Some items are available at designated stores only.
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